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Contents

Music in the Early Twentieth Century

DEGENERACY

Chapter:
CHAPTER 13 Music and Totalitarian Society
Source:
MUSIC IN THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

In any case, a stance of high moral dudgeon is harder to maintain with respect to Mussolini’s Italy than it is with respect to the other twentieth-century totalitarian states, whose histories were incomparably bloodier. Fascist Italy entered the phase that now inspires universal condemnation—primarily for its imperialist adventures in Africa and Albania, and its persecution of minorities—in its last decade, beginning in the mid-1930s, chiefly in consequence of its military alliance with Nazi Germany, with whose policies it had to maintain a united front.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 13 Music and Totalitarian Society." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 21 Sep. 2019. <https://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-013004.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 13 Music and Totalitarian Society. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Early Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 21 Sep. 2019, from https://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-013004.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 13 Music and Totalitarian Society." In Music in the Early Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 21 Sep. 2019, from https://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-013004.xml
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