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Contents

Music in the Early Twentieth Century

CHAPTER 3 Aristocratic Maximalism

Ballet From Sixteenth-Century France to Nineteenth-Century Russia; Stravinsky

Chapter:
CHAPTER 3 Aristocratic Maximalism
Source:
MUSIC IN THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Richard Taruskin

It is time to confess to a scandalous omission. An entire genre, with a history extending back as far as the sixteenth century, has been virtually missing from this account of European art music, and it is high time to redress the neglect. The slighted genre is that of theatrical dance and the music written to accompany it—in a word, ballet. It is no accident that the word is French. Ballet was French in a much realer, more objective way than any of the Frenchnesses described in the preceding chapter, because it was historically, not merely “essentially” French. It was French, that is, in documented fact, not just by nationalistic assertion.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 3 Aristocratic Maximalism." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 7 Dec. 2019. <https://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-chapter-003.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 3 Aristocratic Maximalism. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Early Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 7 Dec. 2019, from https://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-chapter-003.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 3 Aristocratic Maximalism." In Music in the Early Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 7 Dec. 2019, from https://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-chapter-003.xml
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