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Contents

Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries

THE “SYMPHONIC” CONCERTO IS BORN

Chapter:
CHAPTER 11 The Composer’s Voice
Source:
MUSIC IN THE SEVENTEENTH AND EIGHTEENTH CENTURIES
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Despite Haydn’s unprecedented achievements in the realm of instrumental music, his catalogue contains a notable gap. His output of concertos is relatively insignificant. Only two or three dozen works of that kind are securely attributed to him, which may sound prolific enough until his hundred-plus symphonies and eighty-plus quartets are set beside them. Nor are they of a quality to stand comparison with those better-known works. Among them are a couple of perky little items that still figure occasionally on concert programs: a harpsichord concerto in D major and an unusual one in E♭ for “clarino” (that is, trumpet played high), composed in London in 1796.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 11 The Composer’s Voice." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 17 Jul. 2019. <https://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-div1-11003.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 11 The Composer’s Voice. In Oxford University Press, Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries. New York, USA. Retrieved 17 Jul. 2019, from https://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-div1-11003.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 11 The Composer’s Voice." In Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 17 Jul. 2019, from https://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-div1-11003.xml
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