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Contents

Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries

SIGN SYSTEMS

Chapter:
CHAPTER 10 Instrumental Music Lifts Off
Source:
MUSIC IN THE SEVENTEENTH AND EIGHTEENTH CENTURIES
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

That difference lies in the respective media employed. For Josquin, the primary means at his disposal was a vocal composition, in which it was actually the words that conveyed the message he wished to impart. For Haydn, a wordless instrumental composition was the preferred medium for a no less pointed message. Instrumental music was effectively displacing vocal music as the medium of greatest cultural prestige. That was already something unthinkable in Josquin’s time. But even more important, instrumental music gained that prestige by developing what was previously an unthinkably precise and powerful expressive potential.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 Instrumental Music Lifts Off." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 17 Jul. 2019. <https://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-div1-10009.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 10 Instrumental Music Lifts Off. In Oxford University Press, Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries. New York, USA. Retrieved 17 Jul. 2019, from https://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-div1-10009.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 Instrumental Music Lifts Off." In Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 17 Jul. 2019, from https://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-div1-10009.xml
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