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Contents

Music in the Late Twentieth Century

BACK TO NATURE?

Chapter:
CHAPTER 10 Millennium's End
Source:
MUSIC IN THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Our ease with fragmentary listening may be an artifact of (or an adaptation to) modern living. But it might also be “natural,” as at least one recent theory of music, itself possibly an artifact of the burgeoning postliterate age, contends. That theory, called “concatenationism,” received its most extensive exposition in a 1997 book called Music in the Moment. The title reflects an abiding interest of many theorists of avant-garde music (like Jonathan Kramer), who have responded to Karlheinz Stockhausen's notion of Momentform, the idea that contemporary composition is (or may be, or should be) based on a series of unique irreducible impressions or Gestalts, a concept that obviously points toward the “musical atom” theories of high-tech theorists of the 1990s like Kyle Gann.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 Millennium's End." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 25 Feb. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-010016.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 10 Millennium's End. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Late Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 25 Feb. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-010016.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 Millennium's End." In Music in the Late Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 25 Feb. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-010016.xml
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