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Contents

Music in the Late Twentieth Century

MUSIC AND COMPUTERS

Chapter:
CHAPTER 10 Millennium's End
Source:
MUSIC IN THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

But the medium least dependent on notation had always been electronic music, which can bypass the performance process as well as the pencil-and-paper process. And no medium was more thoroughly transformed during the 1980s than electronic music, thanks to the advent of personal computers, the very thing that Pierre Boulez was so determined to stave off. From the perspective of midcentury modernism he was right to fear it. Personal computers revolutionized every aspect of music making from composition (including nonelectronic composition) to performance to distribution to consumption. And at every level their effect has been to simplify and democratize the art. But in the process they may have dealt the literate tradition a slow-acting death blow.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 Millennium's End." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 27 Nov. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-010009.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 10 Millennium's End. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Late Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 27 Nov. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-010009.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 Millennium's End." In Music in the Late Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 27 Nov. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-010009.xml
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