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Contents

Music in the Late Twentieth Century

POLYSTYLISTICS

Chapter:
CHAPTER 9 After Everything
Source:
MUSIC IN THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Over the next decade, then, Schnittke emerged, together with Denisov and the Soviet Tatar composer Sofia Gubaidulina (b. 1931), as one of the so-called “Big Troika” of late-Soviet nonconforming composers regarded throughout Europe and America as major figures in contemporary music. Of the three, Schnittke was of particular interest for the way his career trajectory seemed to complement those of the Western postmodernists, taking his music out of the Darmstadt or Donaueschingen orbit and into the major or “mainstream” concert venues. This further stimulated press interest in him during his lifetime, and vouchsafed his posthumous reputation as a defining force in the music of the twentieth century's final quarter.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 9 After Everything." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 23 Oct. 2017. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-009013.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 9 After Everything. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Late Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 23 Oct. 2017, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-009013.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 9 After Everything." In Music in the Late Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 23 Oct. 2017, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-009013.xml
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