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Contents

Music in the Late Twentieth Century

ITS BEGINNINGS FOR MUSIC

Chapter:
CHAPTER 9 After Everything
Source:
MUSIC IN THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

The most direct evidence of a postmodernist turn in music came right alongside the Green challenge to the idea of progress. The big story of the 1950s, we may recall, had been the “conversion” to serialism of figures like Copland and Stravinsky—a story that paid the highest tribute to, and considerably strengthened, the master narrative. Two decades later, the big story and the most convincing evidence that the master narrative was losing its grip were the almost equally conspicuous conversions that took place in the opposite direction.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 9 After Everything." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-009003.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 9 After Everything. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Late Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 13 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-009003.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 9 After Everything." In Music in the Late Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 13 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-009003.xml
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