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Contents

Music in the Late Twentieth Century

FUSION

Chapter:
CHAPTER 7 The Sixties
Source:
MUSIC IN THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

This fusion of purviews in a single critical patchwork was inspired by rock, or rather by rock's success in overthrowing social hierarchies as expressed in music. Rock as a democratizing force had strong repercussions within all other fields of musical production, influencing all of the genres (folk, jazz, classical) that had formerly been considered alien or antithetical (in a word, superior) to the commercial pop scene. The influence of rock as a democratizing or leveling force on these other genres produced furious controversies. In particular, it inspired backlashes from those interested in insulating or protecting the “authenticity” of the non-pop genres from commercial contamination.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 The Sixties." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 23 Jul. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-007006.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 7 The Sixties. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Late Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 23 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-007006.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 The Sixties." In Music in the Late Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 23 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-007006.xml
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