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Contents

Music in the Late Twentieth Century

THE BRITISH “INVASION”

Chapter:
CHAPTER 7 The Sixties
Source:
MUSIC IN THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

That rule began to change during the 1960s. As popular music styles continued to develop along with the rest of “sixties” culture, pop began claiming the loyalty of its audience into adulthood irrespective of educational level; and it began claiming the mantle of “authenticity” as well. The watershed, both in terms of musical content and in terms of audience tenacity, was the advent of the Beatles, an English rock ‘n’ roll group that first performed in America in 1964, soon to be followed by additional British “invaders” like the Rolling Stones, the Who, and many others. They now became the chief model of emulation for American pop performers.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 The Sixties." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 23 Oct. 2017. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-007003.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 7 The Sixties. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Late Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 23 Oct. 2017, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-007003.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 The Sixties." In Music in the Late Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 23 Oct. 2017, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-007003.xml
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