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Contents

Music in the Late Twentieth Century

A MAXIMALIST OUT OF SEASON

Chapter:
CHAPTER 4 The Third Revolution
Source:
MUSIC IN THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Another composer who sought to realize a Busonian vision using electronic instruments as early as he possibly could, but had to wait, was the Franco-American Edgar (or Edgard) Varèse (1883–1965), a remarkable — and remarkably isolated — figure on the avant-garde scene at a time when there was virtually no musical avant-garde to speak of. Like Iannis Xenakis (see chapter 2), Varèse was trained in mathematics and engineering before he studied music seriously. In 1907, after reading Busoni's Sketch of a New Aesthetic of Music, he went to Berlin and sought the author out as a mentor. His interest in electric instruments was kindled even before World War I, at first by the “dynaphone,” an early sound synthesizer invented by the French engineer René Bertrand.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 4 The Third Revolution." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 1 Sep. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-004005.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 4 The Third Revolution. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Late Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 1 Sep. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-004005.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 4 The Third Revolution." In Music in the Late Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 1 Sep. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-004005.xml
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