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Contents

Music in the Late Twentieth Century

AN OLD DREAM COME TRUE

Chapter:
CHAPTER 4 The Third Revolution
Source:
MUSIC IN THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

All of these approaches to direct “electroacoustic” synthesis of music (to use what later became the standard term) had a considerable prehistory by the middle of the twentieth century. It can be traced back even before the invention of electric current, to music boxes and more elaborate mechanical contrivances such as the Panharmonicon of Johann Nepomuk Maelzel (1772–1838; best known as the inventor of the pendulum metronome), an automated orchestra powered by weights and cylinders, for which Beethoven wrote his “Battle Symphony” (a.k.a. Wellington's Victory) in 1813.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 4 The Third Revolution." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 24 Jul. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-004003.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 4 The Third Revolution. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Late Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 24 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-004003.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 4 The Third Revolution." In Music in the Late Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 24 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-004003.xml
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