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Contents

Music in the Late Twentieth Century

ULTIMATE REALIZATION OR REDUCTIO AD ABSURDUM?

Chapter:
CHAPTER 3 The Apex
Source:
MUSIC IN THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

The issues at stake go right back to the origins of literate (i.e., notated) music. The “real-time” practices Benjamin invokes—improvisation, embellishment, creative play—are the practices, and reflect the values, of “oral” culture. Their eclipse marks the full ascendancy of literacy—an ascendancy a full millennium in the making. And indeed the values Babbitt's compositional practices maximize—extreme (approaching “total”) density, fixity, and consistency of texture, maintained over a long temporal (= “structural”) span—are precisely the ones associated with the “spatialization” of music that literacy made possible.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 3 The Apex." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 26 Jul. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-003015.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 3 The Apex. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Late Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 26 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-003015.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 3 The Apex." In Music in the Late Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 26 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-003015.xml
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