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Contents

Music in the Late Twentieth Century

THE PATH TO THE NEW/OLD MUSIC

Chapter:
CHAPTER 3 The Apex
Source:
MUSIC IN THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

These questions, always discomforting, achieved special poignancy after the war—and especially in America, where the sheer research and development of musical technique achieved a prodigious, institutionally supported acme that was never approached in Europe. Stravinsky's location in America colored his serial quest in ways he was probably unaware of, conditioning its slow, cumulative, evolutionary—and yes, somewhat academic—progress (in sharp distinction to the sweeping revolutionary gestures of the Darmstadt school, so reminiscent of Stravinsky's own early maximalist phase).

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 3 The Apex." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 24 Oct. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-003004.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 3 The Apex. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Late Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 24 Oct. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-003004.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 3 The Apex." In Music in the Late Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 24 Oct. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-003004.xml
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