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Contents

Music in the Late Twentieth Century

CONFLICTS DENIED

Chapter:
CHAPTER 2 Indeterminacy
Source:
MUSIC IN THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

There were those, however, who managed to maintain the frayed analogy between “revolutionary” politics and progressive esthetics and reconcile radical politics with radical art, though they did so by reverting to the nostalgic, by then fairly untenable ideal of what was known in the 1960s as the Old Left. The term referred to idealistic remnants of the revolutionary tide that had made the Russian Revolution, who refused to recognize or acknowledge the way in which that Revolution had been betrayed. At a time when the Soviet Union stood, for all the world to see, on the side of enforced artistic populism, these artists defended the old “revolutionary” ideal on both the political and the esthetic fronts.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 2 Indeterminacy." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 22 Dec. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-002008.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 2 Indeterminacy. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Late Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 22 Dec. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-002008.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 2 Indeterminacy." In Music in the Late Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 22 Dec. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-002008.xml
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