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Contents

Music in the Late Twentieth Century

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Chapter:
CHAPTER 2 Indeterminacy
Source:
MUSIC IN THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

The New Grove Dictionary of American Music (published in 1986) claimed flatly that John Cage “has had a greater impact on world music than any other American composer of the twentieth century.”32 That is certainly possible if his impact is measured by the number of artists (not just musicians) who have acknowledged Cage as an influence or an enabler. “He has immense authority,” the art dealer Leo Castelli, an energetic promoter of avant-garde painters and sculptors, said of Cage. “He is, after all, a guru; and just the fact that he was there with his fantastic assurance was important to us all.”33

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 2 Indeterminacy." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 20 Apr. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-002005.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 2 Indeterminacy. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Late Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 20 Apr. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-002005.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 2 Indeterminacy." In Music in the Late Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 20 Apr. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-002005.xml
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