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Contents

Music in the Late Twentieth Century

WHOSE LIBERATION?

Chapter:
CHAPTER 2 Indeterminacy
Source:
MUSIC IN THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

What better reasons did he find? The one that he liked to offer was spiritualistic and vaguely “oriental,” borrowed in the 1940s from an Indian friend, Gita Sarabhai, with whom he was exchanging music lessons, and from whom he learned about the Indian concept of tala, a predetermined rhythmic structure (comparable, as already observed in connection with Messaien, to the talea of the medieval motet) in which he saw reflected his own ideas about “containers.” The purpose of music, she told him (quoting her own Indian music master) was “to sober and quiet the mind, thus making it susceptible to divine influences.”9

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 2 Indeterminacy." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 23 Oct. 2017. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-002002.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 2 Indeterminacy. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Late Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 23 Oct. 2017, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-002002.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 2 Indeterminacy." In Music in the Late Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 23 Oct. 2017, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-002002.xml
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