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Contents

Music in the Late Twentieth Century

DENUNCIATION AND CONTRITION

Chapter:
CHAPTER 1 Starting from Scratch
Source:
MUSIC IN THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Amid the kind of chronic anxiety to which Cold War tensions gave rise, triumphant rhetoric in the arts took on an air of saber-rattling, producing not euphoria but heightened apprehension. It was to the beginnings of that mood that Copland's critics, and eventually the composer himself, were surely reacting when he allowed himself to be persuaded to tone down the end of his Third Symphony. The effects of incipient Cold War anxieties were felt much more directly by artists in the Soviet Union, the surviving (and spreading) totalitarian state, where the government saw the regulation of all society as its proper responsibility.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 1 Starting from Scratch." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 26 Nov. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-001004.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 1 Starting from Scratch. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Late Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 26 Nov. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-001004.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 1 Starting from Scratch." In Music in the Late Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 26 Nov. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-div1-001004.xml
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