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Contents

Music in the Late Twentieth Century

CHAPTER 7 The Sixties

Changing Patterns of Consumption and the Challenge of Pop

Chapter:
CHAPTER 7 The Sixties
Source:
MUSIC IN THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Richard Taruskin

As a catchphrase, “the sixties” does not refer precisely to the decade of the 1960s. Coined in nostalgia, in resentment, at any rate in retrospect, the phrase evokes disruption, a period of social division brought on by a confluence of social transformations. First, and in the United States possibly most important, there was a newly militant and newly successful drive for social equality. The movement for the recognition of the civil rights of racial minorities coincided significantly with the phasing out of European colonial rule in Africa and scored an important victory in 1964 with the passage of a comprehensive Civil Rights Act by the United States Congress.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 The Sixties." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 23 Apr. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-chapter-007.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 7 The Sixties. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Late Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 23 Apr. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-chapter-007.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 The Sixties." In Music in the Late Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 23 Apr. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-chapter-007.xml
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