We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more

Contents

Music in the Late Twentieth Century

CHAPTER 3 The Apex

Babbitt and Cold War Serialism

Chapter:
CHAPTER 3 The Apex
Source:
MUSIC IN THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Richard Taruskin

One effect of the postwar avant-garde, in both its “total serial” and its “indeterminate” phases, was to put the more moderate techniques of prewar twelve-tone music much nearer the middle of the stylistic road, making those who resisted them seem all the more embarrassably conservative. During the 1950s and 1960s nearly everyone experimented with twelve-tone methods, partly out of curiosity, partly in response to the constant pressure to keep stylistically abreast as mandated by the historicist ideology to which practically everyone, regardless of stylistic orientation or one's other artistic convictions, tacitly assented at the middle of the twentieth century.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 3 The Apex." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 24 Nov. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-chapter-003.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 3 The Apex. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Late Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 24 Nov. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-chapter-003.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 3 The Apex." In Music in the Late Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 24 Nov. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-chapter-003.xml
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.