We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more

Contents

Music in the Late Twentieth Century

CHAPTER 2 Indeterminacy

Cage and the “New York School”

Chapter:
CHAPTER 2 Indeterminacy
Source:
MUSIC IN THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Richard Taruskin

The American counterpart to the postwar avant-garde in Europe was a group of composers and performers gathered around the charismatic figure of John Cage (1912–92). Their methods differed so radically from those of the Europeans as to hide their basic affinities from many contemporary observers. What they shared, however, went much deeper than their differences, for both groups sought “automatism,” the resolute elimination of the artist's ego or personality from the artistic product. It was a traditional modernist aim (compare Josè Ortega y Gasset's ideal of “dehumanization”, enunciated in a celebrated essay of 1925), pushed to a hitherto unimaginable extremity.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 2 Indeterminacy." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 28 Aug. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-chapter-002.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 2 Indeterminacy. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Late Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 28 Aug. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-chapter-002.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 2 Indeterminacy." In Music in the Late Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 28 Aug. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume5/actrade-9780195384857-chapter-002.xml
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.