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Contents

Music in the Early Twentieth Century

FINDING ONESELF

Chapter:
CHAPTER 10 The Cult of the Commonplace
Source:
MUSIC IN THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

The watchword remained collage, in many dimensions: within the text, within the music, and in the relationship of text and music. Having worked at Harvard with the famous psychologist William James, who studied the unconscious mind, Stein was interested in aspects of what is sometimes, erroneously, called “automatic writing”—a style (or method) based on free association that violates norms of semantics, syntax, and grammar while relying on phonic and rhythmic play like puns and jingles to achieve emotional epiphanies (“moments of consciousness,”20 she called them) independent of time and memory.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 The Cult of the Commonplace." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 18 Dec. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-010008.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 10 The Cult of the Commonplace. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Early Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-010008.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 The Cult of the Commonplace." In Music in the Early Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-010008.xml
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