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Contents

Music in the Early Twentieth Century

GENDER BENDING

Chapter:
CHAPTER 10 The Cult of the Commonplace
Source:
MUSIC IN THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Apollinaire’s famous definition of surrealism came in the prologue to his play Les mamelles de Tirésias (“The breasts of Tirésias,” 1918), the first explicitly designated “drame surréaliste.” In 1944, at the height of another great war, after turning unexpectedly to religious subject matter in several sober choral works that apparently left his earlier lifestyle modernism behind, Poulenc turned again, just as unexpectedly, to his surrealist roots and set Apollinaire’s by-then-forgotten play to music as his first opera. The new war had made it timely again.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 The Cult of the Commonplace." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 18 Dec. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-010005.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 10 The Cult of the Commonplace. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Early Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-010005.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 The Cult of the Commonplace." In Music in the Early Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-010005.xml
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