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Contents

Music in the Early Twentieth Century

NAKEDNESS

Chapter:
CHAPTER 10 The Cult of the Commonplace
Source:
MUSIC IN THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

The fifty-eight-year-old Satie thus ended his career, in keeping with the insistently youthful tenor of the time, not like a grand old man but more like a declining enfant terrible. The one serious work of his late years was Socrate, a “drame symphonique” that consisted of three extracts from the dialogues of Plato, set for a high (preferably female) solo voice and small orchestra. It was written immediately after Parade for the American-born Princesse de Polignac (née Winnaretta Singer), the heiress to a sewing-machine fortune who had married into the French aristocracy and set up a famous salon where she presented “chamber-theatricals” for which she commissioned works by many prestigious artists.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 The Cult of the Commonplace." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-010004.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 10 The Cult of the Commonplace. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Early Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 10 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-010004.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 The Cult of the Commonplace." In Music in the Early Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 10 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-010004.xml
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