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Contents

Music in the Early Twentieth Century

THE DEATH OF OPERA?

Chapter:
CHAPTER 9 Lost—or Rejected—Illusions
Source:
MUSIC IN THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

These debates are worth pondering in detail, not so much for the sake of the issues they raised in their day, but simply as an indication of how seriously artworks were both meant and taken as political expressions in Weimar Germany. The vigor with which Der Jasager was discussed, and the frequency with which it was performed, are evidence in turn of a larger historical situation that now seems far more deserving of comment than it could possibly have seemed at the time. The operas and musical plays discussed in this chapter—by Prokofieff, by Berg, by Krenek, by Hindemith, and by Weill—were successful and popular in a way that almost no opera has been since 1933. For the thriving operatic economy of the Weimar Republic was the last truly thriving—that is, consumption-driven—economy in the history of opera.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 9 Lost—or Rejected—Illusions." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-009011.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 9 Lost—or Rejected—Illusions. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Early Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 10 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-009011.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 9 Lost—or Rejected—Illusions." In Music in the Early Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 10 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-009011.xml
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