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Contents

Music in the Early Twentieth Century

NEW-MORALITY PLAYS

Chapter:
CHAPTER 9 Lost—or Rejected—Illusions
Source:
MUSIC IN THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Together with Hindemith alone, Brecht produced another Lehrstück that was first performed under that name alone in 1929 at a new music festival near the German resort town of Baden, but was later published as Das Badener Lehrstück vom Einverständnis, “The Baden lesson on acquiescence.” It embodies an even more stringent version of the lesson contained in the Lindbergh piece. It is also about a flyer, an unnamed pilot who is injured in a crash. He appeals for help but is persuaded by the chorus that he does not deserve it; rather he is taught to acknowledge the insignificance of his own life within the social scheme, and to accept death.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 9 Lost—or Rejected—Illusions." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-009010.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 9 Lost—or Rejected—Illusions. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Early Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 10 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-009010.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 9 Lost—or Rejected—Illusions." In Music in the Early Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 10 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-009010.xml
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