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Contents

Music in the Early Twentieth Century

THEORY AND PRACTICE

Chapter:
CHAPTER 6 Inner Occurrences (Transcendentalism, III)
Source:
MUSIC IN THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

So much for the theory. To observe it in practice, we can return to the harmonic progression we encountered at the beginning of the song Erwartung. Such progressions, in which “color chords” arise from the use of multiple neighbor tones, occur time and again in Schoenberg’s early songs. The one in Ex. 6-2 comes from Der Wanderer (“The wanderer”), op. 6, no. 8, a Nietzsche setting that dates from 1905. In the context of E-flat major, the unusual chord achieves both its intelligibility and its poetic effect from its easily apprehended relationship to the tonic triad.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 6 Inner Occurrences (Transcendentalism, III)." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 18 Dec. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-006006.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 6 Inner Occurrences (Transcendentalism, III). In Oxford University Press, Music in the Early Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-006006.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 6 Inner Occurrences (Transcendentalism, III)." In Music in the Early Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-006006.xml
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