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Contents

Music in the Early Twentieth Century

EXPRESSION BECOMES AN “ISM”

Chapter:
CHAPTER 6 Inner Occurrences (Transcendentalism, III)
Source:
MUSIC IN THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

The problem with Gurrelieder, so far as Schoenberg was concerned, was not merely its public appeal but its very public (“extrovert”) orientation. Mythic pageantry was certainly a viable and time-honored manifestation of romanticism, but Schoenberg’s artistic isolation had wed him to an older and, he thought, truer romantic attitude. Indeed, Schoenberg’s was an updated and intensified version of the original German romantic attitude, the one associated musically with Beethoven (as interpreted by critics such as E. T. A. Hoffmann), and with the “Schubert circle.”

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 6 Inner Occurrences (Transcendentalism, III)." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 18 Dec. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-006003.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 6 Inner Occurrences (Transcendentalism, III). In Oxford University Press, Music in the Early Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-006003.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 6 Inner Occurrences (Transcendentalism, III)." In Music in the Early Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-006003.xml
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