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Contents

Music in the Early Twentieth Century

APPROACHING THE ULTIMATE

Chapter:
CHAPTER 4 Extinguishing the “Petty ‘I’ ” (Transcendentalism, I)
Source:
MUSIC IN THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Scriabin wrote ten piano sonatas in addition to his many miniatures, but they were not his biggest pieces. In fact, as his career went on they became smaller: the Fourth Sonata (1904) has two movements, like Beethoven’s op. 111, but in reversed order so that it ends with a vertiginous prestissimo volando (flying at great speed). From then on, they were all single-movement works like Liszt’s Sonata in B minor; and from the Sixth Sonata on, as the whole-tone and octatonic collections took over the normative functions formerly exercised by major and minor tonalities, Scriabin dispensed with the use of key signatures or designations.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 4 Extinguishing the “Petty ‘I’ ” (Transcendentalism, I)." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-004005.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 4 Extinguishing the “Petty ‘I’ ” (Transcendentalism, I). In Oxford University Press, Music in the Early Twentieth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 10 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-004005.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 4 Extinguishing the “Petty ‘I’ ” (Transcendentalism, I)." In Music in the Early Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 10 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume4/actrade-9780195384840-div1-004005.xml
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