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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

Contents

Chapter:
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY

    • Introduction xi
    • Preface xxi
  1. Chapter 1 Real Worlds, and Better Ones 1

    Beethoven vs. Rossini; Bel Canto Romanticism

    Deeds of music • The dialectical antithesis • The Code Rossini • Imbroglio • Heart Throbs • “Realism” • Bel canto • Utopia

  2. Chapter 2 The Music Trance 61

    Romantic Characterstücke; Schubert's Career

    The I and the we • Private music • Altered consciousness • Salon culture • Schubert: A life in art • Privatizing the public sphere • Crossing the edge • Only connect • New cycles • B-minor moods • Constructions of identity

  3. Chapter 3 Volkstümlichkeit 119

    The Romantic Lied; Mendelssohn's Career; the Two Nationalisms

    The lied is born • The discovery of the folk • Kultur • Lyrics and narratives • The lied grows up: Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven • Schubert and romantic irony • Representations of consciousness • Romantic nationalism • The liturgy of nationhood • The oratorio reborn • Mendelssohn and civic nationalism • Nationalism takes a turn • Epilogue: Two prodigies

  4. Chapter 4 Nations, States, and Peoples 187

    Romantic Opera in Germany (Mozart, Weber), France (Auber, Meyerbeer), and Russia (Glinka)

    PEASANTS (GERMANY)

    Mr. Natural • Der Freischütz

    HISTORY (FRANCE)

    Opera and revolution • Bourgeois kings • Grandest of the grand • Vagaries of reception

    PEASANTS AND HISTORY (RUSSIA)

    A newcomer to the tradition

  5. Chapter 5 Virtuosos 251

    Paganini and Liszt

    Stimulus • Response • The concerto transformed • A divided culture

  6. Chapter 6 Critics 289

    Schumann and Berlioz

    The public sphere • What is a philistine? • Literary music • How music poses questions • Anxiety and recoil • Instrumental drama • The limits of music • Varieties of representation • Discriminating romanticisms

  7. Chapter 7 Self and Other 343

    Chopin and Gottschalk as Exotics; Orientalism

    Genius and stranger • National or universal? • Or exotic? • The pinnacle of salon music • The Chopinesque miniature • Nationalism as a medium • Harmonic dissolution • Playing “romantically” • The Chopinesque sublime • Sonata later on • Nationalism as a message • America joins in • Art and democracy • Stereotyping the other: “Orientalism” • Sex à la russe • The other in the self

  8. Chapter 8 Midcentury 411

    The New German School; Liszt's Symphonic Poems; Harmonic Explorations

    Historicism • The new German school • The symphony later on • But what does it really mean? • The new madrigalism • Art and truth • Art for art's sake

  9. Chapter 9 Slavs as Subjects and Citizens 443

    Smetana, Glinka, and Balakirev

    Progressive vs. popular • The nationalist compact • Fluidity • Folk and nation • How the acorn took root • National becomes nationalist • The politics of interpretation

  10. Chapter 10 Deeds of Music Made Visible (Class of 1813, I) 479

    Wagner

    The problem • Art and revolution • The artwork of the future, modeled (as always) on the imagined past • From theory into practice: The Ring • Form and content • The texture of tenseless time • The sea of harmony • Desire and how to channel it • The ultimate experience • How far can you stretch a dominant? • When resolution comes… • The problem revisited

  11. Chapter 11 Artist, Politician, Farmer (Class of 1813, II) 563

    Verdi

    Spooked • The galley years • The popular style • Tragicomedy • Opera as modern drama • A job becomes a calling • Compression and expansion • Comedization

  12. Chapter 12 Cutting Things Down to Size 617

    Russian Realism (Musorgsky, Chaikovsky); Opéra Lyrique; Operetta; Verismo

    Going too far • Art and autocracy • Stalemate and subversion • Crisis • Codes • Lyric drama • Satyr plays • Operetta and its discontents • Verismo • Truth or sadism?

  13. Chapter 13 The Return of the Symphony 675

    Brahms

    The dry decades • Museum culture • New paths • Three “Firsts” • Struggle (with whom?) • A choral (and a nationalistic) interlude • Inventing tradition • Victory through critique • Reconciliation and backlash • Brahminism • Developing variation

  14. Chapter 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National 745

    Bruckner, Dvořák, Beach, Franck, Saint-Saëns, Borodin, Chaikovsky, Elgar, Vaughan Williams, Grieg, Sibelius

    Germany recedes • Symphony as sacrament • A Bohemian prescription for America • An American response • War brings it to France • Symphonist as virtuoso • The epic style • Symphonies of Suffering • National Monuments

    • Notes
    • Art Credits
    • Further Reading
    • Index

Citation (MLA):
"." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 21 Jan. 2017. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-miscMatter-015006.xml>.
Citation (APA):
(n.d.). . In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 21 Jan. 2017, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-miscMatter-015006.xml
Citation (Chicago):
"." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 21 Jan. 2017, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-miscMatter-015006.xml