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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

THE EPIC STYLE

Chapter:
CHAPTER 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Russian symphonies in the nineteenth century came under two brand names. One was provided by the conservatories, founded in the 1860s by Anton Rubinstein in St. Petersburg and his brother Nikolai in Moscow. The other was provided by the last generation of aristocratic autodidacts, gathered around Miliy Balakirev in St. Petersburg beginning in the 1850s. Best known today as the moguchaya kuchka, the “Mighty Little Heap” (a sobriquet bestowed on them in 1867 by Vladimir Stasov, their publicist, but then monopolized for a while by their enemies), the Balakirev Circle preferred to call itself the New Russian School as a way of declaring solidarity with Liszt and the New Germans, as against the “old Germans” who manned the conservatories.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 23 Nov. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-014007.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 23 Nov. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-014007.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 23 Nov. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-014007.xml
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