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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

AN AMERICAN RESPONSE

Chapter:
CHAPTER 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

But the question regarding the appropriateness of “plantation songs” remains. His use of them implies that for Dvořák, coming as he did from the outside, Native-American and African-American folklore were interchangeably “American” in connotation. For Americans, the great majority of whom were by then of European immigrant stock, it was not so. For Americans interested in cultivating the European art music tradition—meaning, in the first instance, German immigrants, in the second, cultivated Anglo-Saxons—it was even less so, for such an interest marked one off as even more “Eurocentric” than the average.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 2 Aug. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-014004.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 2 Aug. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-014004.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 2 Aug. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-014004.xml
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