We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more

Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

SYMPHONY AS SACRAMENT

Chapter:
CHAPTER 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Brahms's main Viennese rival as a symphonist was Anton Bruckner (1824–96), a slightly older composer who had an even later start than Brahms as a composer of symphonies. He was trained as an organist and church choirmaster, and quietly plied that trade at St. Florian's, a seventeenth-century monastery near the Austrian port city of Linz, where he became kapellmeister in 1858. Ten years later he moved to Vienna to take a post as professor of harmony and counterpoint, and also worked as “provisional organist” in the Imperial Chapel until his spreading fame as a virtuoso and improviser procured his elevation to the post of court organist in 1878.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 19 Dec. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-014002.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 19 Dec. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-014002.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 19 Dec. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-014002.xml
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.