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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

TRUTH OR SADISM?

Chapter:
CHAPTER 12 Cutting Things Down to Size
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

That was the question, all right. What really divided the musical world in the wake of romanticism was the relationship between the artist and “the contemporary listener”— that is, the paying public and its “needs.” It is the issue that more than any other defined the terms within which the history of “art music” would unfold in the twentieth century, the first century that had need of such a category. (A preliminary teaser: What could be the reason for defining some—but only some—musical genres a priori as “art”? What is excluded from the definition? What should the excluded portion be called?)

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 12 Cutting Things Down to Size." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-012010.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 12 Cutting Things Down to Size. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 10 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-012010.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 12 Cutting Things Down to Size." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 10 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-012010.xml
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