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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

OPERETTA AND ITS DISCONTENTS

Chapter:
CHAPTER 12 Cutting Things Down to Size
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

It was in order to make up a double bill with La Périchole, one of the later operettas of Offenbach, that a London theater manager, Richard D'Oyly Carte, commissioned a tiny one-acter from Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900), a graduate of the Leipzig Conservatory who was then serving as principal of a newly opened music academy called the National Training School (now the Royal College of Music). The libretto was by William S. Gilbert (1836–1911), then a staff writer for Fun, the Victorian equivalent of Mad magazine, who specialized in skits that burlesqued standard operas of the day.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 12 Cutting Things Down to Size." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 26 May. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-012008.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 12 Cutting Things Down to Size. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 26 May. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-012008.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 12 Cutting Things Down to Size." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 26 May. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-012008.xml
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