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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

COMEDIZATION

Chapter:
CHAPTER 11 Artist, Politician, Farmer (Class of 1813, II)
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

The “comedization” of late-nineteenth-century opera was an unstoppable tide. The term should not be misunderstood. It does not necessarily have to do with humor, although the process it denotes did give humorous opera (among other things) a boost. It designates, rather, what is more often termed (or mistermed) “realism.” Comedization works better than realism in this context because it suggests something concrete about forms and styles (namely, their shrinkage and “popularization”) without making unwarranted claims about the nature of plots, which were often far from “realistic.”

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 11 Artist, Politician, Farmer (Class of 1813, II)." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 18 Apr. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-011009.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 11 Artist, Politician, Farmer (Class of 1813, II). In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 18 Apr. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-011009.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 11 Artist, Politician, Farmer (Class of 1813, II)." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 18 Apr. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-011009.xml
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