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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

WHEN RESOLUTION COMES…

Chapter:
CHAPTER 10 Deeds of Music Made Visible (Class of 1813, I)
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

The Prelude is thus the opera's essential deed of music, made immediately visible with the raising of the curtain. The resolution of the drama, as Wagner put it in his program note, cannot take place in the visible realm, but only in blissful extinction, which is transcendence of the Will:

the rapture of dying, of being no more, of ultimate release into that wondrous realm from which we stray the furthest when we strive to penetrate it by the most impetuous force. Shall we call it death? Or is it not night's wonder-world, out of which, as the saga tells us, an ivy and a vine sprang up in locked embrace over Tristan's and Isolde's grave?49

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 Deeds of Music Made Visible (Class of 1813, I)." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 31 Jul. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-010011.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 10 Deeds of Music Made Visible (Class of 1813, I). In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 31 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-010011.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 Deeds of Music Made Visible (Class of 1813, I)." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 31 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-010011.xml
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