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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

DESIRE AND HOW TO CHANNEL IT

Chapter:
CHAPTER 10 Deeds of Music Made Visible (Class of 1813, I)
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

That “more” is a technique that composers ever since the Counter Reformation had employed to induce a sort of esthetic ecstasy in listeners and save their souls from the snares of rationalism. It consists in strategic harmonic delays, and what is delayed is “closure,” or functional resolution. The heightened expressivity thus connoted arises not out of cognitive symbolism or “extroversive” reference, the representational mode of which Wagnerian leitmotives would be the supreme example. Rather, that expressivity arises out of “introversive” reference whereby the music, by forecasting closure and then delaying it, calls attention to its own need for cadential resolution.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 Deeds of Music Made Visible (Class of 1813, I)." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 31 Jul. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-010008.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 10 Deeds of Music Made Visible (Class of 1813, I). In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 31 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-010008.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 Deeds of Music Made Visible (Class of 1813, I)." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 31 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-010008.xml
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