We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more

Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

THE NEW MADRIGALISM

Chapter:
CHAPTER 8 Midcentury
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

There was another way in which the new emphasis on poetic or literary content affected New German musical style, and it proved ultimately the more subversive one. In curious fashion it paralleled a much earlier striving for the “unity of the poetic and the musical,” when in the late sixteenth century the composers of those sophisticated Italian part-songs known as madrigals became carried away with the project of representing strong emotion in their music and infused it with a degree of chromaticism without precedent, and without equal until precisely the moment we are now investigating, when a similar impulse (though now more strongly motivated by philosophical than by emotional content) turned Liszt into the nineteenth century's most zealous harmonic experimenter.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 8 Midcentury." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 19 Dec. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-008005.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 8 Midcentury. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 19 Dec. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-008005.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 8 Midcentury." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 19 Dec. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-008005.xml
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.