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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

THE SYMPHONY LATER ON

Chapter:
CHAPTER 8 Midcentury
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Except for the chauvinistic bombast, to be taken on faith or not at all, we can put all this heady rhetoric and theorizing to the test at last by examining one of Liszt's symphonic poems. Les préludes, eventually published in 1856 as Symphonic Poem No. 3 with a dedication to Princess Sayn-Wittgenstein, was not the first of the set to be performed. It was the first to have been conceived and sketched, however, possibly as early as 1841; and it is the only one of the thirteen to have survived in standard repertory. It is also one of the shortest and (partly in consequence) one of the most radical, and is for all of these reasons perhaps the most revealing of Liszt's innovative project.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 8 Midcentury." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 23 Aug. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-008003.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 8 Midcentury. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 23 Aug. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-008003.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 8 Midcentury." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 23 Aug. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-008003.xml
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