We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more

Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

SEX à LA RUSSE

Chapter:
CHAPTER 7 Self and Other
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

This process can be traced very vividly in the music of Russian composers, who were if anything even more obsessed with the development of orientalist tropes than were the French. The reason for their obsession was twofold. In the first place, Russia was engaged throughout the nineteenth century in imperialistic expansion into Islamic territories, first in the Caucasus (where the indigenous populations were in fact Christian as well as Muslim), later in what the Russians called “Central Asia,” the vast plain or steppe south of Siberia and north of Iran, Afghanistan, and China.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 Self and Other." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 23 Jul. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-007015.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 7 Self and Other. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 23 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-007015.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 Self and Other." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 23 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-007015.xml
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.