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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

ART AND DEMOCRACY

Chapter:
CHAPTER 7 Self and Other
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin
Art and Democracy

ex. 7-16b Chorus from “Home on the Range,” arranged for barbershop quartet by Ozzie Westley, mm. 17–end

As an emissary from America to Europe, then from Europe to America, and finally between Americas; as a mediator between low culture and high society, and then between high culture and “low” society; as a shuttler between culture and commerce; and as a perpetual peripatetic whose selfhood was always defined by some sort of otherness, Gottschalk led an emblematically liminal existence—an existence on the borders—that defined a particularly “American” moment in the history of European music. It was a moment of confrontation that presaged the hardening of categories and the closing of borders.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 Self and Other." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 24 Apr. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-007013.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 7 Self and Other. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 24 Apr. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-007013.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 Self and Other." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 24 Apr. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-007013.xml
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