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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

PLAYING “ROMANTICALLY”

Chapter:
CHAPTER 7 Self and Other
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

The other area in which the rights of the romantic subject are paramount in Chopin is in the realm of performance practice, particularly the crucial matter of tempo rubato. Chopin's playing was so unusually marked by it that there were those among his contemporaries who actually thought that he had invented the technique of arbitrarily “stealing” time from some notes so as to lengthen others for expressive effect, an arbitrary act being referable to no standard save the actor's subjective desire for it. Chopin was indeed one of the first to use the actual word rubato as an explicit if fuzzy performance direction, rather than relying only on traditional directions for tempo modification like accelerando (or stretto), ritenuto, etc., or else (like several eighteenth-century composers, including C. P. E. Bach and Mozart) indicating its effect with melodic ties and syncopations.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 Self and Other." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 25 Feb. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-007008.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 7 Self and Other. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 25 Feb. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-007008.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 Self and Other." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 25 Feb. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-007008.xml
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