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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

OR EXOTIC?

Chapter:
CHAPTER 7 Self and Other
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Chopin's prodigious gifts manifested themselves very early, and inevitably took him away from his homeland, which then offered a musician little scope for a career. He published his first polonaise in 1817 at the near-Mozartian age of seven and made his public debut with orchestra the next year, playing a concerto by Adalbert Gyrowetz (or Jírovec), a very old-fashioned Bohemian composer whose Haydnesque works upheld the unmarked “universal” style. Ironically enough, his first recognition from on high came from Tsar Alexander I, elder brother of the “northern autocrat” Chopin would later so come to hate, who heard him in Warsaw in 1825 and rewarded him with a diamond ring.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 Self and Other." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 22 Sep. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-007003.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 7 Self and Other. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 22 Sep. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-007003.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 Self and Other." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 22 Sep. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-007003.xml
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