We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more

Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

HOW MUSIC POSES QUESTIONS

Chapter:
CHAPTER 6 Critics
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

To savor the experience of literary music without the concurrent medium of words we may consider two piano compositions from Schumann's freshest, most idealistic period, one of them tiny, the other grand. A proviso first: although words do not figure concurrently in piano music, they are often present in the form of titles, epigraphs, textual allusions, and so on. These definitely and purposefully mediate the effect of the notes and should be thought of as part of the work rather than as an “extramusical” expendable or a mere concession to “unmusical” beholders. The latter view gained a lot of currency in the twentieth century, owing to the confusion of the romantic idea of “absolute music” with a vein of antiromantic formalism that later invaded musical thought.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 6 Critics." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 1 Aug. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-006004.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 6 Critics. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 1 Aug. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-006004.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 6 Critics." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 1 Aug. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-006004.xml
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.