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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

THE LIED GROWS UP: HAYDN, MOZART, BEETHOVEN

Chapter:
CHAPTER 3 Volkstümlichkeit
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Until the end of the eighteenth century, and even a bit beyond, the lied was considered a lowly genre, the province of “specialist” composers (i.e., hacks) like Reichardt and his “Second Berlin School” contemporaries Johann Abraham Peter Schulz (1747–1800) and Carl Friedrich Zelter (1758–1832), Goethe's favorite, who as director of the Berlin Singakademie played a leading part in the Bach revival, another manifestation of burgeoning German nationalism.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 3 Volkstümlichkeit." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 24 Feb. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-003005.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 3 Volkstümlichkeit. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 24 Feb. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-003005.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 3 Volkstümlichkeit." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 24 Feb. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-003005.xml
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