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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

LYRICS AND NARRATIVES

Chapter:
CHAPTER 3 Volkstümlichkeit
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

The imitation folk poetry of German romanticism came in two main formal types: lyrics and narratives. The lyrics were often cast as “dance songs” that resemble the stanza-and-refrain forms used in medieval poetry, and not by accident: next to contemporary “folk” or oral culture, the expressive culture of medieval times, precisely because they were the Dark Ages, was newly valued by romantics as a storehouse of unsullied lore.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 3 Volkstümlichkeit." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 30 Aug. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-003004.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 3 Volkstümlichkeit. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 30 Aug. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-003004.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 3 Volkstümlichkeit." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 30 Aug. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-003004.xml
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