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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

ALTERED CONSCIOUSNESS

Chapter:
CHAPTER 2 The Music Trance
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

The effect of these modulations on the music's temporality, that is the audience's experience of time, is comparable to the effect of an operatic scene in which static “aria time” supervenes on the action-time of recitative. To evoke such an introspective effect in instrumental music is precisely the act whereby instrumental music becomes romantic. It was the effect against which Goethe—romanticism's most formidable opponent, sometimes misread as a romantic himself because he described what he opposed so compellingly—issued his dire warning in Faust (1808).

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 2 The Music Trance." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 24 Jul. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-002003.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 2 The Music Trance. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 24 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-002003.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 2 The Music Trance." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 24 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-002003.xml
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