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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

THE CODE ROSSINI

Chapter:
CHAPTER 1 Real Worlds, and Better Ones
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Perhaps the greatest difference between the romantic sensibility, as represented by Beethoven, and the pre-romantic one, as exemplified by Rossini, lay in their respective attitudes toward forms and genres. As early as his op. 1, a set of piano trios, Beethoven was strongly inclined to “push the envelope” with respect to genre, transgressing generic and stylistic boundaries in a way that made his teacher Haydn uneasy. As his career went on, Beethoven's attitude toward form became increasingly—and deliberately—idiosyncratic, with the result that it was always with him (and with us, contemplating him) an important esthetic issue.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 1 Real Worlds, and Better Ones." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 20 Aug. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-001003.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 1 Real Worlds, and Better Ones. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 20 Aug. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-001003.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 1 Real Worlds, and Better Ones." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 20 Aug. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-div1-001003.xml
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