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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

CHAPTER 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National

Bruckner, Dvořák, Beach, Franck, Saint-Saëns, Borodin, Chaikovsky

Chapter:
CHAPTER 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Richard Taruskin

Reviewing Brahms's Fourth Symphony at its Vienna premiere in 1886, Eduard Hanslick marveled that the city had witnessed nineteen symphonic premieres by as many composers over the previous twelve-month period. “It looks as though Brahms's successes have stimulated production, following the long silence which set in after Mendelssohn and Schumann,”1 he concluded. Hanslick exaggerated Brahms's personal responsibility for the phenomenon—little things like wars also played a part, as we shall see—but he was certainly right to marvel. By the mid-1880s “symphonists” were no longer quite as rare as hens’ teeth, nor were they all professors and pupils.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 25 Oct. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-chapter-014.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 25 Oct. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-chapter-014.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 14 The Symphony Goes (Inter)National." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 25 Oct. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-chapter-014.xml
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